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  Jacob Riis

Yochelson, Bonnie
Language : EnglishLondon : Phaidon, 2001Orriak zenbatu gabe : zuri-beltzeko irudiak ; 16 cm(Ikus) Testua. (Ikus) Irudia (finkoa ; bidimentsiokoa): bitartekorik gabeSeries : Phaidon 55ISBN : 0-7148-4034-3.Riis, Jacob (1849-1914) | Photography -- Artists | Photography -- United States of AmericaJacob Riis (Wikipedia es) | (Wikipedia en)
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Gozatu Ikasi
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Arteleku 21 RIIS jac (Browse shelf) Available 655052

Phaidon web:
Jacob Riis (1849-1914) is known first and foremost as a social reformer rather than as a photographer per se. He became aware of the terrible conditions under which immigrants to the United States were forced to live while he was working as a police reporter for the New York Tribune. His experiences convinced him to devote his life to social reform. Riis was very aware of the new technology of photography and its ability to persuade and to mobilize public opinion. He employed it not for artistic ends, but as a powerful support for his campaign to alleviate poverty and clear New York of its slums. His highly influential book "How the Other Half Lives" (1890), which is still in print today, was the first book of its kind to be illustrated with photographs.
Photography is the visual medium of the modern world. It pervades our lives and shapes our perceptions. 55 is an ongoing series of beautifully produced, pocket-sized books that explore all aspects and styles of photography. They celebrate the world's most important photographers from the spheres of art, photojournalism, science, street photography, fashion photography and travel photography.
Each volume of 128 pages focuses on an individual master's life work and its development. It features 55 of their key works presented chronologically with an accessible introduction and critical commentaries, telling both the photographer's story and the story of the world that shaped their views.

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